Addicted to Photography

February 08, 2014  •  3 Comments

ATLAS SHRUGGED-2ATLAS SHRUGGED-2 I love photography!  When the weather turns, the sun peeks through a cloud just so, or I feel an uncontrollable urge to capture an object that piques my abstract eye, I pop the camera in the bag and I'm off.

The death of yet another artistic talent, Phillip Seymour Hoffman, has us scratching our know-it-all, yet unknowable noggins about the prevalance and persistence of addiction. Neuroscience and medicine have made huge strides in spelling out the witches brew of genetics, individual lifeways, and personal trauma that have helped us to bypass judgment and move towards greater understanding.  Still, no one-size-fits-all remedy prevails.

I would imagine actors, like Hoffman, are more prone than most to yo-yo-ing between the unsteady states of never good enough and grandiosity that plague the human condition.  The thespian hauls to the stage the entire pallet of human emotions and must color them true for our entertainment.  Like soldiers returning from war, we become uncomfortable when performers bleed the theater into their everyday existence.

We all have our secret sauce, ritual behaviors, or places we go when the daily merry-go-round spins out of control.  Creative processes - photography, writing, and other visual arts, have provided me with the metaphors I need to balance my world between jet-fueled propulsions and a vegetative state.  Daily walks in the desert also help to erode the buildup of psychological plaque that can endanger the health of my heart.

As I've contemplated this subject over the last few days, I realize I need to suspend judgment as to someone else's struggles to balance the weight of their world and/or to withdraw from critiques of the efficacy of their chosen flavor of brain smoothie.  

Through the lens, the landscape before me is framed by the camera, yet only serves to inform my vision when I take the time to compose what I want to create.  With the same lens, with your eye, other worlds and possibilities appear.  

The same, yet different, where we see each other through it.

 

 


Comments

3.John Spurr(non-registered)
Well written.... It is indeed a shame when someone's demons or weaknesses overtake them and drag them down. Unfortunately, we can't actually walk in someone else's shoes... we can only imagine.
2.Beata Moore(non-registered)
Oh, so very true and so to the point! The faster heart beat when all comes beautifully in front of you and you know you have nail the shot, the exhausted satisfaction after, the smile on the face combined with fear of the judgment of others, the luck of directions and artistic emptiness one day and as you said, jet-fuelled energy, next day -I know it so well!
1.Deb Tappan(non-registered)
Wow!! Loved your insight. Your words so beautifully put onto paper what I have been feeling... and I love this picture. Writer and photographer! You are awesome!
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